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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of the way first. i want to go straight to your b
of this presidential campaign and some historical perspective on this year's race. give we are glad you joined us. a conversation with oliver stone and peter kuznick coming up. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move
. this story was still coming together and we, it didn't seem like the crime of the century to us. we thought we had a pretty good has not gull on it. >> i think there's always a benefit of doubt given to someone like general petraeus who has had an honorable career in the military for 37 years. we respect expad meyer people from the military, i'm from a military family. there are still a lot of questions out there. lots of journalists can ask and law enforcements is asking. when that statement is made and has been through all of the newspaper articles that the fbi has pretty much concluded there was no transfer of classified information from general petraeus to paula broadwell. i'm not convinced we know the full answers to that yet. why then did the fbi spend four hours at paula broadwell's home last night. point number two, how is it general pa contemporaneous and paula broadwell were able to share a private e-mail account where they saved e-mails in draft folders and the other person logged in to that same log in so they could read the same e-mails in the draft folder. it is a common techn
. we're glad you've joined us. a conversation with frank rich coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and tavis: a quick look at what is coming up on this program. actress keira knightley is on. and her film "anna karenina" based on the tolstoy classic. thursday and friday night, a two-part conversation. you do not want to miss this, sally field portrays mary todd lincoln in the new steven spielberg film. we continue our look at the fallout from this year's presidential election with frank rich, the former ku near times writer. his piece in the magazine this week is called "fighting sea- fantasyland." he joins us tonight from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> g
a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: for more tonight on the election of 2012 and what it means beyond the results, i am pleased to be joined by amy goodman. she is the host of "democracy now!" and her new book is called "the silent majority." she joins us from new york. good to have you back on this program. >> it is great to be with you, tavis. tavis: there so as to talk about. your thoughts on what happened this week, giuliani presidential race and whether you were surprised by any of the results. >> i definitely thought that president obama would win. when you look at what mitt romney said along the way, when you looked at his actions, when you look at the 47%, i wondered if he would win, if his number would be 47%, talking about the people who would not vote for him. but president obama, now in his second term, i think presents us an extremely interesting challenge to many of the people who voted for him. i mea
sent out by the tea party patriots that the republican elite foisted this weak moderate on us. >> ifill: already it begins. >> and so that's not fair. i think he ran better than the party. >> woodruff: you're saying, david, you don't think there are things he could have done differently? should have done differently. >> well, every campaign has mistakes. the 47% comments were not helpful. he could have positioned himself differently in the primaries. he could have done the last two debates differently. but i thought he gave some of the best speeches of his life in the last couple weeks. >> woodruff: the first debate he did extremely well. >> ifill: it should be said that the crowd had been deflated after waiting for a while to hear from the guy but they did get a little bit of full-throated war when paul ryan's name was mentioned. more so than when mitt romney walked out. so paul ryan has a future in the party. >> paul ryan has a future. reelected to his house seat. but the record for defeated vice presidential candidates seeking the nomination, if you want to begin with henry cabot lod
, "larry king now." join us for conversation about election night. coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we continue to digest the results of last night, i could not think of a better person to break down the results that a man who has covered so many of these. how many? since what year? >> on the broadcast of 1960. >> i was born in 1964. >> stop it. i was on the radio and television in 1960. it was the first televised debate. tavis: i remember this. >> nixon had just come from the hospital. i heard it from the radio. i thought it was a tie. when i got to the studio i heard that cannady murdered him. tavis: the talk-show host is doing a new project,
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)